Tuesday, 4 June 2024
-- Advertisement --
Liberty Club Level3 Divers24

Car-sized turtle fossil discovered

The BBC reported the discovery of a turtle fossil that was the size of a passenger car. The unusual find was made in the northern part of South America, the BBC website reported. The findings of scientists studying the find confirm that the tortoise, measuring 4 metres and belonging to the species Stupendemys geographicus, lived
Published: February 29, 2020 - 15:30
Updated: July 22, 2023 - 19:22
Car-sized turtle fossil discovered

The BBC reported the discovery of a turtle fossil that was the size of a passenger car. The unusual find was made in the northern part of South America, the BBC website reported.

The findings of scientists studying the find confirm that the tortoise, measuring 4 metres and belonging to the species Stupendemys geographicus, lived in this area between 13 and 7 million years ago. Fossils of representatives of this species have been found in the Tatacoa desert in Colombia and in the Urumaco region of neighbouring Venezuela.

-- Advertisement --

The first fossils of giant tortoises were discovered as early as the 1970s, but many mysteries about these extraordinary animals still remain to be uncovered. We know that tortoises were about the size and weight of a passenger car and inhabited huge wetlands in the north of South America, even before the Amazon and Orinoco rivers were created.

_110893402_mediaitem1108859012

The male was thought to have forward-facing horns on either side of the shell. Deep scars discovered on the fossils studied indicate that the horns were probably used as a means of fighting off rivals. The fossils found have also given scientists some clues about the diet of giant tortoises.

Researchers believe that these giant creatures lived at the bottom of lakes and rivers, adjacent to giant crocodiles, and that their diet was varied and the turtles had a variety of small animals in their menu, as well as many plants, fruits and seeds.

The great size of Stupendemys was crucial in defending itself against other large predators living during the same period. This is evidenced by traces such as a giant crocodile tooth stuck in a turtle fossil.

It is a great pity that these great creatures have not lived to see our times. An underwater encounter with such a colossus would certainly be an unforgettable experience for any diver.

Source: bbc.com

Other posts
Share:
Facebook
Telegram
LinkedIn
Twitter
Pinterest
WhatsApp

About author

Tomasz Andrukajtis
Editor-in-chief of the DIVERS24 portal and magazine. Responsible for obtaining, translating and developing content. He also supervises all publications. Achived his first diving certification – P1 CMAS, in 2000. Has a degree in journalism and social communication. In the diving industry since 2008.
-- Advertisement --
freediving dive insurance dan
-- Advertisement --
Level3 Club CCR Divers24
Recent post
Baltictech Conference, last days to catch tickets at discounted price.
Shearwater Peregrine TX: The Ultimate Diving Companion
Baltictech 2024: Dive into Inspiration - Tickets Now on Sale!
Adriatic Depths: Cultivating Sustainable Tourism through Underwater Heritage
Jared Hires: A Tragic Loss in the Depths of Plura Cave
Opal Mine Unsolved Mystery of Solomon Goldschmidt's Hidden Treasure
You haven't read yet
Introducing the Divesoft Reel
Baltictech Conference, last days to catch tickets at discounted price.
Marcin Bramson Discusses His Switch to Divesoft Liberty and the Future of Rebreather Diving
Lungfish Orca v6 Rebreather Achieves CE Certification
Shearwater Peregrine TX: The Ultimate Diving Companion
Raid HYPOXIC TRIMIX OC course to 100 metres
More posts in this category

Search...

The Divers24 portal is currently the largest online medium treating diving in Poland. Since 2010 we have been providing interesting and important information from Poland and around the world on all forms of diving and related activities.

Contact us: info@divers24.com