Thursday, 16 May 2024
-- Advertisement --
Liberty Club Level3 Divers24

French divers find steamer that sank in 1892

After two arduous years of searching, the efforts of a group of French divers have been crowned with success. At a depth of 108m they managed to locate the wreck and identify it as the Marechal Canrobert, which sank in a collision in 1892. A team of divers consisting of Florent. M Locatelli, Lerome Espla
Published: June 3, 2011 - 13:21
Updated: July 22, 2023 - 07:26
French divers find steamer that sank in 1892

FrenchSteamer

After two arduous years of searching, the efforts of a group of French divers have been crowned with success. At a depth of 108m they managed to locate the wreck and identify it as the Marechal Canrobert, which sank in a collision in 1892.

-- Advertisement --


A team of divers consisting of Florent. M Locatelli, Lerome Espla and Romain Lhost, found the steamer which, after leaving the port of Marseille, ended its service, taking 107 human lives to the bottom.

On 7 July 1892, while crossing between Bône and Marseille, the steamer Marechal Canrobert collided with the battleship Hoche in the course of manoeuvres she was carrying out and sank in less than 8min near the island of Planier.

According to a New York Times article of 8 July 1892, 107 people lost their lives during this disaster, some of them as a direct result of the collision with the battleship. On that day, at the time of the accident, 85 passengers were watching the manoeuvres from the deck of the Marechal Canrobert.

The steamer was almost cut in half by a heavy armed battleship and moments later was under water. All aboard died except for two soldiers and three children.

The disaster occurred 18mil off the coast of Marseille and was caused by an error in judgement of the situation and distance, by the captain of the vessel Marechal Canrobert.

According to the divers, the 75m long wreck is preserved in surprisingly good condition. The divers made a descent lasting 4h and 20min, using trimix and CCR rebreathers, allowing them to remain at a depth of 110m for 30min.

Source: xray-mag.com

Other posts
Share:
Facebook
Telegram
LinkedIn
Twitter
Pinterest
WhatsApp

About author

Tomasz Andrukajtis
Editor-in-chief of the DIVERS24 portal and magazine. Responsible for obtaining, translating and developing content. He also supervises all publications. Achived his first diving certification – P1 CMAS, in 2000. Has a degree in journalism and social communication. In the diving industry since 2008.
-- Advertisement --
technical diver tuna hastberg mine
-- Advertisement --
Level3 Club CCR Divers24
Recent post
Wreck of the long lost WWI U-Boat SM UC-55 identified off the Shetland coast
Two ancient amphorae recovered from ancient wreck in Italy
New footage identifies WWII submarine wreck
91 wrecks opened to diving in Greece
Greek divers unearth artifacts from 19th century wreck
In Malta, nets were removed from the wreck of HMS Southwold
An 18th century warship found in the Aegean Sea
You haven't read yet
Lungfish Orca v6 Rebreather Achieves CE Certification
Shearwater Peregrine TX: The Ultimate Diving Companion
Raid HYPOXIC TRIMIX OC course to 100 metres
Sintzi Cave Exploration: Polish Divers' Double Success in Greece
Baltictech 2024: Dive into Inspiration - Tickets Now on Sale!
Adriatic Depths: Cultivating Sustainable Tourism through Underwater Heritage

Search...

The Divers24 portal is currently the largest online medium treating diving in Poland. Since 2010 we have been providing interesting and important information from Poland and around the world on all forms of diving and related activities.

Contact us: info@divers24.com