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An unknown wreck of a German vessel has been discovered at Scapa Flow!

In one of the most famous locations for wreck divers – the Scottish Scapa Flow, the wreck of a previously unknown German vessel from World War I has been found! The unusual discovery was reported by the English BBC through its website. Preliminary findings indicate that the wreck found is a pinnace type vessel. It
Published: May 6, 2017 - 15:31
Updated: July 22, 2023 - 15:05
An unknown wreck of a German vessel has been discovered at Scapa Flow!

In one of the most famous locations for wreck divers – the Scottish Scapa Flow, the wreck of a previously unknown German vessel from World War I has been found! The unusual discovery was reported by the English BBC through its website.

Preliminary findings indicate that the wreck found is a pinnace type vessel. It is a small boat, which was mainly used to supply larger vessels stationed in the area. According to the investigators, the boat probably went down together with the vessel to which it was assigned. According to the assumed version of events, this happened when it was decided to sink all units of the Kaiserliche Marine, so that they would not fall into enemy hands at the end of the war in 1919.

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The wreck was unexpectedly stumbled upon by a group of divers from Orkney, combing the area with sonar from aboard the vessel MV “Valkyrie”. At one point, readings from the bottom exploration equipment indicated an object that piqued the interest of the crew and eventually led to the location of a new wreck.

From the deck of the boat, however, it was difficult to identify what the object standing out on the sonar screen was. Simon Brown dived down to see for himself what had been found. Descending to the bottom, he expected it to be a lump of torpedo netting. So imagine his surprise when, instead, he came upon a previously unknown almost 100-year-old wreck!

On 19 June 1919, more than 50 German ships were sunk in the Scapa Flow region. All this was done to prevent the enemy army from seizing the ships at the end of the war. Many of the units were recovered later, but some are still lying on the bottom and, as you can see, some are still waiting to be discovered.

Source: bbc.com, deep3d.co.uk

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About author

Tomasz Andrukajtis
Editor-in-chief of the DIVERS24 portal and magazine. Responsible for obtaining, translating and developing content. He also supervises all publications. Achived his first diving certification – P1 CMAS, in 2000. Has a degree in journalism and social communication. In the diving industry since 2008.
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